MEDIA LINKS

https://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/usc-graduate-finds-her-dream-career/3741262/

https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/02-diagnosis-dr-heidi-webster-staff-fasd-clinic/id1478393204?i=1000449921326

https://www.usc.edu.au/about/usc-news/news-archive/2017/september/psychology-researchers-target-foetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorder

https://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/New-media-prize-recognises-coast-artists/2386357/

https://www.sunshinecoastdaily.com.au/news/roller-derby-craze-sweeps-uni-staff-students-off-t/1910867/

https://www.usc.edu.au/about/usc-news/news-archive/2016/june/usc-survey-seeks-insights-into-terrorism-fears

WHAT CAN I EXPECT AT MY FIRST SESSION?

WHAT CAN I EXPECT AT MY FIRST SESSION?

In the first session, your cognitive behaviour therapist should:

  • Undertake a thorough assessment – you will be asked about past experiences and treatment to better understand the nature of the difficulties for which treatment is being sought.

  • Give you an opportunity to tell them anything you think is relevant to your issue.

  • Explain the basis of cognitive behaviour therapy and how it works

  • Explain what you can expect from therapy

  • Give you an idea of how long you will need to see them – the number of sessions varies with the type of difficulties being treated.

  • Discuss the treatment plan with you including goals and ways to monitor progress.

 

WHAT CAN I EXPECT IN FUTURE SESSIONS?

CBT is a well-planned therapy focused on outcomes. There are a range of techniques and styles in CBT, but regardless of their approach, each session your therapist should:

  • Give you an opportunity to tell them what has happened since you last saw them

  • Explain what will happen during that session

  • Measure and keep you informed about your progress

  • Give you time to practise any new skills and ask any questions during the session

 

WHAT CAN I EXPECT IN BETWEEN SESSIONS?

CBT is an active therapy – sometimes described as a ‘doing therapy’ rather than a ‘talking therapy’. So, individuals will be expected to be active participants in their own therapy. This means that you can expect to be fully involved in your sessions and to develop with your therapist some tasks to practice in between sessions. Sometimes these tasks are called ‘homework’.

 

WHO CAN PROVIDE CBT?

CBT sounds like quite a simple therapy, but it takes a skilful therapist to be effective. A competent cognitive behaviour therapist will have had substantial training and experience in the area. Most professionals using CBT (i.e. Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Mental Health Nurses etc.) should be registered with their relevant professional registration board, which oversees professional training and competence. AACBT provides a national accreditation system for CBT practitioners.

 

THINGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAPPEN WITH YOUR THERAPIST.

Your cognitive behaviour therapist should never:

  1. Enter into a sexual relationship with you – whether you initiate it or they initiate it

  2. Enter into any other improper dual relationship

  3. Divulge information about you unless:

    1. you specifically authorise in writing the release of information; or

    2. the release of information is to protect you or others from harm; or

    3. the release of information is required by law.

  4. Exploit you, for example by asking favours of you

  5. Force or try to coerce you to engage in a particular type of treatment, such as group therapy.

A qualified therapist would be expected to practice the code of ethics applicable to their profession. Be sure to contact relevant regulatory bodies if you are concerned about the practice of a therapist.

 

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